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November 2018
November 2018 Complete Issue - PDF Download
Tuesday, November 6th, 2018
Features
21 | When Does a Driver Have to Submit to a Law Enforcement Officer’s Request to Take a Breath or Blood Test? What Every Driver Should Know - By J. Gary Trichter
25 | Pat Priest: A Profile in Judicial Courage - By Mark Stevens
30 | Mental Illness & Criminal Defense - By Judge Patrick Priest
When Does a Driver Have to Submit to a Law Enforcement Officer’s Request to Take a Breath or Blood Test? What Every Driver Should Know
Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

In Texas, there appears to be significant confusion among citizens, law enforcement, and even lawyers as to when it is proper for a law enforcement officer to ask for a breath or blood specimen.

Pat Priest: A Profile in Judicial Courage
Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

A. Just call Priest.

The following scenario played out hundreds of times in the Bexar County Courthouse over the last four decades: Some thorny issue of substance or procedure would arise during a trial or hearing, and the judge would call a brief recess to solve the problem.

Mental Illness and Criminal Defense
Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

Twice during my years practicing law, situations arose in other parts of the country, and were reported nationwide, in which it became public knowledge that a lawyer representing someone accused of abduction and murder knew quite literally where the body could be found and did not disclose it.

Why You Must Find Something to Love About Your Client
Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

A jury of 6 or 12 will decide the fate of this human life you have in your hands. “Yeah, but the charge is Continuous Sexual Abuse of a Child, and I have children. I can’t get past the charges.” If that is the inner voice you hear, get to know your client—not just a little bit, but a lot.

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