Executive Officer’s Perspective: Do you love what you do?

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“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life,
and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.
And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.”

– Steve Jobs

As everyone starts going back in to work, we notice a seismic shift between working from home and in the office. The previous year held many challenges for working parents, juggling their full-time jobs and taking care of children (and, if you were like me, taking on the role of warden and teacher). This past year’s social isolation totally unsettled me. A people person, I surprised myself by all too easily becoming something of an unsocial couch potato. The anxiety built as we let our guard down in the spring, thinking things were getting better, then boom—a new strain crept in.

Still, many of our staff returned to the office immediately after Austin’s mandatory shutdown lapsed. As things opened up more, I too returned to face the new challenges: from traveling, to ever-changing COVID rules, to dealing with children thinking themselves free of virtual school (since “the warden” no longer occupied a home office). I am so glad they are back to in-person school, though I do feel sad for our COVID puppies, now alone at home. Did anyone else‘s children beg for a pet that has now become your responsibility?

Through all the disruption, the workforce has changed too: In association/events and hotel industries, for instance, many employees have moved on, some working remotely—if at all. Several companies have given up or reduced their office space, maybe rotating shifts to adjust. With courts not yet 100% operational, we still face zoom court and may well into the future. Some say that zoom and team rotations are the way of the future. Really? Sure, many jobs can be managed remotely or on a rotating basis, but if you work in an industry that provides service to people, how can you do this from home? You need to interact, serve, provide resources.

More than a year in, service industries like restaurants struggle to maintain a staff. One person now does the job of three. To this, we can all relate. The bottom line, at the end of the day, is can you provide your customer the best service. This new reality faces a challenge as everyone opens up to in-person events, social gatherings, vacations. In Austin, for one, employers must deal with the daunting prospect of a job market that’s become ultra-competitive, each company trying to offer more than the next (a boon to service employees, of course).

But when you’re running a small business, whether with one or more employees, each person has a job. And when you’re understaffed, struggling to fill positions, you will ultimately have to spend time training any new hires, assimilating them in your way of doing things. What sets your work culture apart from the next? Do you mentor your team? The job is not always about pay. Don‘t get me wrong; everyone loves a hefty paycheck. What makes a job desirable, though, may lie in the extras—the atmosphere—you offer. Is there a passion for the industry? A job may be stressful, but at the end of the day, is it rewarding? Can you believe in what you do? I hear all too often how people dread going to work. What things do you do to ensure your team doesn‘t feel this way? There are so many things you can do that are not financially prohibitive. Sometimes that just means thinking outside the box.

With TCDLA, what makes our staff special is their motivation to provide the best service. If an issue arises, we want to resolve it immediately. Our members are our extended family we’ve grown to know and care about. I attended several seminars recently and listened closely to what the speakers and attendees had to say. For me, this sort of continuing education is invaluable. Networking with peers assists me in keeping up with the newest trends, technology—but most important, in finding ways we can better serve our members.

TCDLA
TCDLA
Melissa J. Schank
Melissa J. Schank
Melissa J. Schank, Chief Executive Officer, has worked with nonprofit associations for over 20 years, and has been with the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association more than 15 years. She earned her master’s of human resources, business administration, bachelor’s of communication and mediation certificate from Saint Edwards University in Austin, Texas, and is a certified association executive. Her greatest strengths are overseeing the long-term planning, financial management, and strategy for legal educational programs, in addition to managing the organization’s seminars, membership, publication, and communication departments.

Melissa J. Schank, Chief Executive Officer, has worked with nonprofit associations for over 20 years, and has been with the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association more than 15 years. She earned her master’s of human resources, business administration, bachelor’s of communication and mediation certificate from Saint Edwards University in Austin, Texas, and is a certified association executive. Her greatest strengths are overseeing the long-term planning, financial management, and strategy for legal educational programs, in addition to managing the organization’s seminars, membership, publication, and communication departments.

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