Tips for Avoiding Lawyer Burnout

Having practiced criminal law for over 20 years, I am sometimes asked, “Have you ever felt burned out?” My response is, “it’s not if, but when, and how many times?” If you are going to make the practice of law a lifelong career, I guarantee that you’ll be burned out more than once in your practice. Traditional advice is usually something along the lines of taking a vacation, spending time with your family, investing time in a hobby, exercise, and so forth. The problem with this advice is that it does not deal with the core problem of why you are feeling burned out. You may have a fantastic vacation only to come back to work and feel worse than you felt when you left! You may spend time with your family, but if you are in a horrible mood from work, they may want away from you! You may take up golf, but you may lose your IRA in broken clubs thrown into the water hazard! As we all know, depression can be a significant struggle in our profession. So, what can you do? Here are three tips that have helped me over the years, and I hope they will help you.

Tip #1: Avoid situations that you hate.

This may sound easier said than done… especially when the mortgage is due. However, the cumulative effect of going to court with clients/issues/judges that you despise takes its toll on you over the years. Try your best to flow around these situations. If you hate defending sex crimes, don’t take them. If you’re on the appointment list, ask not to be appointed to these types of cases. If you hate a judge, avoid going to his/her court if possible. If you despise writing appeals, don’t be on the appellate list or take appeals.

Tip #2: Become an authority on cases you like.

This is the flip side to #1. If you enjoy helping first-time offenders getting cases sealed/expunged, try to get your name out as the expungement guru. If you love the science behind determining alcohol concentrations in breath or blood, get the word out in the legal community that this your thing. Write a paper for TCDLA. Give a lecture at a college/bar meeting. Make a YouTube video and add the link to your website.

Tip #3: Seek out help.

I mean seek out legal help. If you have a horrible trial you just can’t get out of, ask a colleague you trust to sit second chair or ask a college/law student to be your assistant. He/she may only be responsible for being a buffer between you and your client. But the emotional support from having a friendly face that is on your side cannot be overemphasized. Feeling like the world is against you when the judge, jury, prosecutor, and sometimes your client can be demoralizing. If you have a legal problem that has you stumped, reach out to a friend, colleague, or TCDLA. If you have a challenging federal case, call the federal defenders in your area. Most people are flattered when you ask them for advice. It makes them feel like you trust their opinion. We all need that from time to time.

In conclusion, I hope these tips have been of some help. We are all comrades in arms and deal with the same type of problems: Austin, Houston, Dallas, Nacogdoches, and everywhere in between. Take care, good luck, and have fun!

TCDLA
TCDLA
Dean Watts
Dean Watts
Dean Watts is Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. He has been a TCDLA member since 1998, and practices criminal law in Nacogdoches, Texas. He can be reached at .

Dean Watts is Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. He has been a TCDLA member since 1998, and practices criminal law in Nacogdoches, Texas. He can be reached at .

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